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Pearlfisher Waitrose

Waitrose Extends LOVE life and Makes You Count…

\"\"English premium grocer Waitrose is expanding its award-winning Private Brand Waitrose LOVE life. The new brand extension was created by the brand and design agency Pearlfisher who also created the original design strategy, brand identity, naming and design expression for Waitrose LOVE life. The new range of delicious and nutritionally balanced foods will launch in Waitrose stores at the end of June.

\"\"According to the Waitrose website:

The new Waitrose LOVE Life You Count… range, includes tasty breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacking options, is the simple way to watch what you eat – and relish every mouthful.

The brand is based on the principles of healthy weight loss – eat a bit less and move a bit more. Selecting products from the LOVE Life You Count… range at each meal occasion will make sure that you eat around 500 fewer calories than you normally would, which, when combined with our regular exercise, should help you to shift any excess pounds.

The new range boasts lower fat versions and calorie-controlled portions of favorites including a rich tasty lasagne, creamy yogurts and soft, spicy hot cross buns. With brightly colored calorie counts on the front of the packs – you can literally count the calories as you do your shopping.

The range is the grocer’s largest sub-brand launch since essential Waitrose, with over 270 products, and answers a demand from over half of Waitrose customers to help them include a wider range of whole food ingredients and avoid saturated fats in their diets. In addition, the Waitrose LOVE life logo will start to be further used on products and ingredients across the retailer’s entire offer, highlighting nutritional benefits to customers. Pearlfisher Creative Director, Natalie Chung, comments, “Waitrose is an experience – an experience that is rooted in food but that goes well beyond food. The bright, bold packs and vibrancy of color reflect the variety, choice and nutritionally balanced offer and will also ensure stand out on shelf. The naming and design expression is also about bringing taste and vitality together to create an experience of freedom and pleasure.”

Waitrose Marketing Director, Rupert Thomas, comments, “Waitrose LOVE life gives people a new and unrestricted approach to eating a wide variety of the right thing. The new identity effectively works to indicate the nutritional value of the range and the design reflects its energy, vitality and positivity. We are thrilled with the work that Pearlfisher has done.”

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guests Pearlfisher Tess Wicksteed

A way with words. Visualizing the Verbal.

\"Pearlfisher

This guest post comes from frequent contributor, Tess Wickstead, Strategy Director of the international design agency Pearlfisher. Her post discusses the importance of naming and language, which  if you have seen me speak in the last year you know how near and dear this subject is to my heart.

Take her words to heart and lets all work together to move beyond the  Great/Guaranteed/Clear – Value/Essential/Basic “labels” that have proliferated and create memorable, distinct and ownable BRANDS.

A way with words. Visualizing the Verbal.

In my last posts I spoke about the shift from ‘private label’ to ‘private brand’ and the elements of design that must be embraced in order to maximize a private label brand\’s potential. We have considered how to gain creative confidence through strategy and express desire through structure. Last, but by no means least, we come to words.

For private label retailers, with a wealth of different products across different categories, words are vital. Words offer interpretation and inspiration and importantly will breath life to a specific range or product, elevating its status. Private label retailers have always used naming to segment their ranges, but now we are seeing more retailers adding voice to the mix to create ranges and products that stand alone as brands in their own right. This allows them to better compete with their branded counterparts, create strong loyalty and simultaneously give kudos to the retailer itself.

Words are crucial when launching a brand with impact, telling its story – its reason for being. All too often the design world uses words as a creative rather than narrative device. But words must be purposeful in order to be heard – their graphic treatment is crucial, but rather than fitting them into a design concept, language must be considered as an equal partner – created and crafted to express real meaning and speak with true power. Design creates instant connection; words can strengthen that bond by speaking directly to customers and demonstrating a deeper level of detail. They balance the delivery of information with the delivery of delight – good language makes the reader feel emotionally engaged and truly appreciated. Ultimately, a name gives you a powerful identity, and a voice a distinctive personality.

The strongest brand names bring clarity to the consumer while revealing the depth of the product\’s offering. They articulate a core idea through their meaning, their appearance and the way they sound out loud. The best names stick in the mind, forming vivid images and standing for something real.

When we created the name for Waitrose LOVE life we looked to the products that aimed to take people from a restricted lifestyle to a liberated one. Waitrose LOVE life was a name that reflected this liberation, a name that celebrated food in all its unique beauty, goodness and pure vibrancy. ‘LOVE life’ disrupts the diet category\’s bland, compromised and apologetic approach to health, while sitting comfortably with the Waitrose brand and its generous approach to retail.

The name In-Kind is about being considered, beautiful and special. It challenges the language of the traditional personal care category with a distinct tone of voice that establishes a relationship with the consumer, and this ethos is underlined in the tagline: \’Share the best you.\’ Another example of great tone of voice and naming in private label is Target\’s up & up brand. What is refreshing is that up & up is not trying to imitate brand-name counterparts; instead, the name highlights the positivity and optimism of household purchases, making their lower prices secondary to the brand.

Naming and tone of voice sets private brands free by bringing to life their own individual meaning and character. They can define a powerful personality, allowing a brand to be refreshingly unique and impossible to ignore. A name and voice reminds us why a product is such a valued part of our lives

\"\"Tess Wicksteed, Strategy Director, Pearlfisher
Tess’s great talent is the instant ability to see the wood for the trees. As the creative force behind Pearlfisher’s strategic offer, she trades in originality, clarity and logic, getting to the point fast and delivering strategy that’s both creative and cohesive. A longstanding Pearlfisher person, Tess was Strategy Director in London for ten years before relocating with her family for a brand new challenge in New York.

As a literature student at York, Sussex and Cambridge Universities, Tess was keen to become first a clown, then a teacher. However, it was her belief that good culture matters that finally led to a career in design and an ongoing commitment to creating powerful brands that contribute positively to the world. Short and sharp in all things, Tess balances refreshing bluntness with disarming humanity. Her presence on a project promises fireworks – and guarantees results.

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Pearlfisher Tess Wicksteed

The Importance of Structure in Private Brand.

 

This guest post comes from frequent contributor, Tess Wickstead, Strategy Director of the international design agency Pearlfisher.

\"\"There is a huge opportunity for private label retail brands to lose their stigma as the ‘poor relative’ of their branded counterparts and to learn from their behavior. Strategically led design will drive it. There will be a distinct shift from ‘private label’ to ‘private brand’. In my last guest post I talked about the importance of a strong creative strategy to give creative confidence and as a result get the most out of your products through design. And there are so many elements of design that can and should be maximized. Let\’s consider structure.

When a brand\’s structural design perfectly fits its purpose and its brand truth, immense desire can be created. Think of the iconic brand structures of Method, Absolut Vodka, POM, Help Remedies….the list goes on. So why can\’t we see more unique structures in private label? Of course, pure imitation or cloning national brands doesn\’t work, resulting in a less worthy aesthetic. However, when the opportunity presented by good structural design is neglected, a fantastic opportunity is missed.

Packaging design that\’s aligned to a brand\’s truth has the power to become an integral touch point because it is tangible and can create long-term brand loyalty, desirability and connection. It is the packaging design that has the opportunity to excite, enhancing day-to-day life and day-to-day purchases in the most innovative and engaging way. What is key is the power of physical touch and maximizing this opportunity so that when on shelf and in the hand, brands relate, connect and belong to the consumer. A strong structure that connects with the brand truth and the central brand identity is crucial.

\"\"Effective private label structural design ups the ante with an increased premium feel and consumer desire to bring products into \"\"their homes. In the case of In-Kind, structural design became its major equity, creating immediate on-shelf standout, with a feeling of specialness yet accessibility. The curvaceous structure fits snuggly in the hand during use. But, we also see Target\’s pharmacy range breaking the mould through structural innovation and Victoria\’s Secret\’s meaty \’Very Sexy\’ beauty line and trademark Bombshell perfume. Waitrose in the UK have been exploring different brand structures for a while now, launching Umi and Umi Spa in 2005. The unique structures immediately elevate a brand to one that consumers would want to have on their bathroom shelves.

Ultimately structural design needs to give physical space and substance to an idea so that first and foremost a brand is given form. But when creating the optimum packaging structure, work cannot be done in isolation. Structure needs to be considered from the beginning and needs to be informed by the brand strategy. Future insight can open our eyes to emergent shifts that will guide us in what will be some of the most desirable emergent forms. For example we have seen food experiencing a renaissance of creativity – a return to both art and unadulterated pleasure. Brand design structure has responded to this as seen through brands like Absolut Glimmer and Marni Laduree. Similarly, what new technical innovations can help bring to life the desired structural vision? Structure needs to be considered right from the start and brought to life as an integrated part of the design process.

Structural design can sometimes be put on the back burner, with perceived high costs, but not all of it is expensive to produce, think of how Jovial pastas work with uniquely die-cut windows and how Green & Black\’s maximizes embossing.

\"\"Retail brands must create a great experience every time a consumer touches a brand, so that a product invites interaction. Structure will create huge desire and can also give real meaning to your brand and what it stands for, enhancing the graphic design too. Think of how the Coca-Cola iconic identity curves around the iconic bottle structure. Structure creates a personal experience for the consumer and is the optimum tool for increasing shelf standout and the desired brands cues, be they premium, powerful, feminine, edgy or organic.

Structure can create the difference, and will make a brand loved.

\"\"Tess Wicksteed, Strategy Director, Pearlfisher
Tess’s great talent is the instant ability to see the wood for the trees. As the creative force behind Pearlfisher’s strategic offer, she trades in originality, clarity and logic, getting to the point fast and delivering strategy that’s both creative and cohesive. A longstanding Pearlfisher person, Tess was Strategy Director in London for ten years before relocating with her family for a brand new challenge in New York.

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Pearlfisher Tess Wicksteed

The Power of Creative Confidence – Private Brand?

This guest post comes from frequent contributor, Tess Wickstead, Strategy Director of the international design agency Pearlfisher. Her premise is essential to the development and growth of Private Brand – We must stop copying, we must stop apologizing for owning brands, we must develop and demonstrate the creative confidence that national brands have for years simply assumed.

The power of creative confidence

It is easy to look at certain brands and envy the look and feel that makes them who they are. And we all believe that good design sells. However, it takes a confident brand to maximize the power of design and get the most out of it. The question is, how can you instil this confidence in your brand and – as a result – give it the (packaging) design that it deserves?

If there is an uncertainty and lack of understanding as to what the core essence of your brand is  – and what it stands for – the ways of making it desirable are more limited and can lead to confusion and disparity at point of purchase for the consumer. However, by understanding the core truth of the brand and what it means to its consumers, creativity can be set free. Once again, we need to keep front of mind the fact that design is the key touchpoint for the consumers. And the role of the designers working with these brands is to bring together the deepest truths and most powerful desires within a brand to allow for a unique and definitive expression.

The power of a strong and consumer relevant brand strategy provides a powerful foundation from which to move the brand forward –   a foundation which allows you to understand how design can be used to create the right language and aesthetic for you. It gives permission for creativity, instilling a necessary confidence which, in turn, becomes self-generating as profile – and, of course, most significantly, sales build. Let\’s look at some examples.

\"\"Personal Care is probably one of the trickiest sectors for Private Label as design needs to promote a high quality look and feel whilst still being synonymous with value. This can only be achieved when retailers corporately get behind each and every product and ensure that all design communication is cemented back into the core brand strategy. And you only have to look at the continued success of Bath & Body Works – consistently feted in the press and awarded by the industry – to see this rings true. The new redesign of its Japanese Cherry Blossom fragrance – the US\’ no. 1 selling fragrance – bears testament to the Label\’s resolute commitment to creative strategy with an amazing premium looking package that belies the $34.50 price tag.

\"\"And when it comes to the fickle world of fashion/lifestyle, Private Label is definitely not  the poor relation. Debuted last month, Target\’s biggest design collaboration to date is with iconic Italian brand Missoni – translating the unmistakeable Missoni aesthetic into an affordable line for everything from babygro\’s to bicycles..Target has, of course, collaborated with many celebrated designers but rather than dilute its core brand proposition, this partnering only strengthens its commitment to the best in design and shows the kudos and esteem with which the Target label is afforded by these premium brands. And, in the case, of Missoni, a brand that shares a synergy of value and core beliefs with the retailer when it comes to focus on quality, family, style…

And I can\’t leave this debate without mentioning the redesign for Hemköp Private Brand from Swedish grocery chain Hemköp. The press release about the recent redesign states that the \”brand was designed to deliver on the Hemköp core brand, which offers its customers a wide and affordable range, inspiring joy of food and good service to meet and exceed customer expectations.\” And the fresh, fun and interactive variety of the designs (for everything from t-shirts to popcorn) perfectly exemplifies the point they – and we – are making. Creative confidence powers brands by providing unity with the brand environment and communications but also a striking – but relevant – difference at point of purchase.

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\"\"Tess Wicksteed, Strategy Director, Pearlfisher
Tess’s great talent is the instant ability to see the wood for the trees. As the creative force behind Pearlfisher’s strategic offer, she trades in originality, clarity and logic, getting to the point fast and delivering strategy that’s both creative and cohesive. A longstanding Pearlfisher person, Tess was Strategy Director in London for ten years before relocating with her family for a brand new challenge in New York.

As a literature student at York, Sussex and Cambridge Universities, Tess was keen to become first a clown, then a teacher. However, it was her belief that good culture matters that finally led to a career in design and an ongoing commitment to creating powerful brands that contribute positively to the world. Short and sharp in all things, Tess balances refreshing bluntness with disarming humanity. Her presence on a project promises fireworks – and guarantees results.

\"\"
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Pearlfisher

Private Brands Celebrate at the Pentawards 2011

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The 250 seats of the Marriott Marquis ballroom in Times Square in New York City were filled to capacity for the sold out Pentawards 2011.
The winners came from Australia, Taiwan, Greece, Brazil. Others came from Argentina, Japan, Israel, Korea.  From China, across Europe, the United States of America, Canada… in all, more than 25 countries were represented at this awards ceremony for the best packaging in the world.

Jack Vogler, who worked alongside Walter Landor, was Master of Ceremonies. Gérard Caron, President of the Pentawards jury then officially declared the ceremony open.

As their names and work were called, the winners came on stage to receive their bronze, silver and gold trophies. 5 Platinum Pentawards were given to the best creations of the year in each of Pentawards\’ five broad categories: Beverages, Food, Body, Other Markets and Luxury.

More than 20 Awards were given to Private Brand Work which included some of the best work of the year Private or National Brand.

Here are a few pics of the winners from the event.

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