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Pearlfisher Waitrose

Waitrose Extends \”LOVE life\” to Prep & Portion

\"WaitroseBritish retailer Waitrose has launched an extension of their award winning Private Brand Waitrose LOVE life, which was launched in June 2011. International branding agency Pearlfisher has created the name, tone of voice and graphic and structural packaging for Waitrose LOVE life Prep & Portion – an innovative new range of kitchen utensils that have been designed to help consumers with portion control and the preparation of healthy meals. Prep & Portion retains the philosophy of the core LOVE life range that takes health and wellbeing from restricted living to a liberating lifestyle. The innovative new 8-piece range aims to make healthy preparation and portion control easy and enjoyable. A selection of the products, including a Cereal Scoop, a Pasta Basket and a 3-in-1 Ladle feature serving indicators, meaning consumers can be sure they’re eating the right size portions.

Pearlfisher Creative Director, Natalie Chung, comments, “It was vital that the new Prep & Portion range retained the LOVE life principles by hero-ing vitality, variety, simplicity, knowledge and inspiration. Design values that are generous, helpful, inspiring and vibrant needed to create a consistent but differentiated look and feel, extending LOVE life into a new area that continues to make healthy eating easier and enjoyable. The new identity and packaging design clearly communicates clarity of product functionality whilst celebrating the healthy eating message associated with the products. The tone of voice for the range – including simple product names, short product descriptors, benefits and ‘Healthy hints’ on the back of pack – communicate the simplicity of preparing healthy meals with the new products. In addition, the structural and minimal design of the packs enables the range to be merchandised together on shelf.”

\"Waitrose

 

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All Other Pearlfisher

Show your expertise. How can Private Brand retailers compete with expert food brands?

\"\"This guest post comes from frequent contributor, Tess Wickstead, Strategy Director of the international design agency Pearlfisher.

Show your expertise. How can Private Brand retailers compete with expert food brands?

\"\"The Private Brand food sector is booming. The quantity and wide array of choices now available is without question, but the quality – or perceived quality – is what really differentiates retailers. One area of growth is being driven by pressure from national brands with artisanal expertise. How can Private Brand brands mirror this highly desirable sense of ownership and expertise?

In the past 10 years there has been a huge global shift in food. We’ve identified a fake to alive shift that is driving the trend for fresh and hand-crafted, and artisanal producers are ticking all the boxes when it comes to delivering a unique and highly desirable proposition. This is an exciting time for brand strategy and design as we develop a new visual language and positioning for these emerging brands. We have had many of these brands coming through our own studio in recent months – from olive and antipasti brand Bodega to new challenger meat brand Mindful Meats. It is certainly a challenge for supermarkets to match these new offers and to find the right way to build a competitive expertise into their own brand.

\"\"Many of the Private Brand retailers and supermarkets have upped the ante through the continued evolution of their specialty areas. Morrison’s Market Street comprises a deli, fishmonger, and greengrocer, as does Hannafords. Wholefoods and Wegmans also do this well. Wholefoods often groups their artisanal cheese, olive and wine selections together to heighten the experience further, and Wegmans is exceptional at creating dynamic store-within-a-store areas like La Boulangerie. Using a dedicated brand space, a representative brand spokesperson, and supporting collateral like in-store recipe cards, magazines and shopping lists brands are able to dial up the impression of market expertise. Eataly exemplifies authority and authenticity in every category, using expert chefs like Mario Batali and Lydia Bastianich to serve as curators of the brand. Whilst definitely playing in a higher tier, Eataly is an incredible example of retailers flexing artisanal muscle.

\"\"On a packaging level, even our most well-known and best-loved brands are feeling the squeeze from this artisanal sector of the market. A news article in USA Today at the end of last year reported how giants such as Frito Lay and Vlasic were adopting “artisan” brand lines. Similarly, Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market has just launched a redesign of its organic private brand packaging resulting in a more ownable and bold solution with better focus placed on the word organic and using the current established green as an overall color for the packs. Finally, Fresh Market made a statement when it launched its artisanal chocolate range last year. Leveraging their high-quality, Italian-made product with a whimsical, yet sophisticated design, they\’re using their new packaging to compete authoritatively with the best of the best in this specialty category. 

Brand design has a huge role to play in defining and bringing to life the expert quality of Private Brand products. When it is done right, Private Brand retailers can and will compete effectively with their expertly branded counterparts!

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Tess Wicksteed is Head of Strategy at Pearlfisher – tess@pearlfisher.com  www.pearlfisher.com
Tess’s great talent is the instant ability to see the wood for the trees. As the creative force behind Pearlfisher’s strategic offer, she trades in originality, clarity and logic, getting to the point fast and delivering strategy that’s both creative and cohesive. A longstanding Pearlfisher person, Tess was Strategy Director in London for ten years before relocating with her family for a brand new challenge in New York.

As a literature student at York, Sussex and Cambridge Universities, Tess was keen to become first a clown, then a teacher. However, it was her belief that good culture matters that finally led to a career in design and an ongoing commitment to creating powerful brands that contribute positively to the world. Short and sharp in all things, Tess balances refreshing bluntness with disarming humanity. Her presence on a project promises fireworks – and guarantees results.

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All Other Pearlfisher

Provenance and Private Brand

\"\"This second post  is from frequent contributor, Tess Wickstead, Strategy Director of the international design agency Pearlfisher. The post comes courtesy of our sister site the first site to focus on licensed, exclusive and Private Brands in fashion and beauty: Prêt a Marque.

My last piece focused on why Private Brand retail needs to assert its voice and fill its space. But Private Brands also need to use their voice to effectively tell their story and leverage their provenance and legacy. Asserting ones provenance is nothing new in the world of branding and design. However, brand provenance is especially interesting in a world where brands must be desirable across a number of diverse cultures.

Whether inherent or explicit, a reference to origin has always featured as a highly desirable and unique attribute of exclusive and desirable brands – from its presence on logos and labels to other visual equities and forms of communication. Think Burberry, Uniqlo, American Apparel.

Today, our market is cluttered with brands telling various stories of provenance. But how we tell this story will start to change now that new retail worlds are opening up to us with global audiences driven by cultural diversity. Cutting through the noise with an authentic expression becomes even more vital and retailers must understand which elements of their provenance to focus on.

\"\"Let’s consider the iconic – and historic – department stores Bloomingdale’s in the US and Harvey Nichols in the UK. Both are revered for remaining true to their roots and rightly trading on the associations of their heritage. And both have transferred this to stores in overseas markets. Harvey Nichols now has stores in Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Hong Kong and Turkey. Similarly Bloomingdales has launched a store in the Dubai Mall.

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Bloomingdale’s have stayed ahead of the curve by understanding the importance of cherishing tradition with finding new ways to create difference as evidenced in the evolution of – and desirability of – the infamous Bloomie’s Little Brown Bag. The Dubai store replicates the shopping experience of the group’s mammoth flagship Manhattan store, down to the shop’s signature black and white chequered floor, but offers certain brands – specifically targeting the Dubai demographic – as exclusives to this store. From summer 2011, Bloomingdale’s expanded their offer of a global experience still further by announcing it was shipping to 91 countries.

Similarly, Harvey Nichols understands the power of the red, blue and white union jack, which has been designed into the front window of the Hong Kong store. Its English heritage is also referenced by the Norman Foster designed Saudi Arabian store. However Middle Eastern culture is celebrated across many touch-points for example the destination restaurant in the Dubai store, Almaz by Momo.

\"\"Our much-loved retail icons and Private Brands have a great story to tell but need to look at the most apposite way of both revolutionizing the definition of their brand provenance and the ideals and demands of the current market and culture. This opens up many exciting branding opportunities.

However, success is no longer necessarily just about literal roots and origin but about a positioning of values and messages. And this presents another route for brands.

Waitrose, for example, has also launched stores overseas but focuses on their values of being a brand that is all about quality, variety and fresh food of the absolute highest standard.

Perhaps the real message – and opportunity – doesn’t only lie in new ways to logo, label and safeguard a brands known heritage, but in allowing retailers to display the kind of provocative and challenging behavior that made them so special in the first place. With the continuing emergence of powerful new markets, private brands need to embrace the opportunity for real open mindedness and find authentic and exciting ways to celebrate provenance in new worlds.

Tess Wicksteed, Strategy Director, Pearlfisher
Tess’s great talent is the instant ability to see the wood for the trees. As the creative force behind Pearlfisher’s strategic offer, she trades in originality, clarity and logic, getting to the point fast and delivering strategy that’s both creative and cohesive. A longstanding Pearlfisher person, Tess was Strategy Director in London for ten years before relocating with her family for a brand new challenge in New York.

As a literature student at York, Sussex and Cambridge Universities, Tess was keen to become first a clown, then a teacher. However, it was her belief that good culture matters that finally led to a career in design and an ongoing commitment to creating powerful brands that contribute positively to the world. Short and sharp in all things, Tess balances refreshing bluntness with disarming humanity. Her presence on a project promises fireworks – and guarantees results.

\"\"
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guests Pearlfisher Tess Wicksteed

Your space is your voice.

\"\"This guest post comes from frequent contributor, Tess Wickstead, Strategy Director of the international design agency Pearlfisher.

As a retailer it is important that you make your retail space speak on your behalf. You have control over the environment and retail space that your products exist in and the development of this space is crucial to distinguishing your brand.

If you visit a store that does this well – think Apple or Victoria’s Secret – the store’s identity is clear even if you were to remove all merchandise. These brands are taking ownership of their spaces and creating a holistic brand identity that transcends the product. The retail space is one of the most effective environments to showcase your brand world. By approaching brand space in the right way you can overshadow your competitors and reinforce your ownership of the aisles.

For many private label retailers the use of retail space is an untapped resource. A brand needs to be looked at in totality and remain true to its values through the entire brand environment. Design can be used to create a seamless experience, where everything from the biggest ideas to the finest details feel cohesive and build upon the larger brand ideals. So what does a brand need to consider when contemplating retail space and brand experience?

See your retail space as an opportunity to build a new dimension into your brands world as well as an opportunity to reinforce your brand’s messaging. To create a complete brand experience within your retail environment it is useful to focus on the following essential principles: cohesion, clarity, connection, empathy, seduction and authenticity. Cohesion is key for creating an overall sense of unity. Clarity helps to create a compelling offer that is easy to understand and simple to navigate. Empathy allows you to create a world with your audience in mind. Connection is key to engaging this audience, creating a lasting emotional bond. Seduction draws people into your experience, making it irresistible. And lastly, authenticity makes the experience special and unique to you.

Publix is an example of a company that is aware of space and utilizes many of the above principles. The store’s motto, Where shopping is a pleasure, reassures us that they are conscious of not only their products, but the store environment itself. Their private label packaging is consistent across product lines but is also pleasing and fun, contributing to their goal of making shopping enjoyable. In a similar way, Wegmans use signage and POS to help reinforce their brand identity with familial and accessible typography and a store environment that keeps the value of exciting food at its core. That said, both stores could work to further align the aesthetics of their private label with the store itself, and vice versa. A more complete integration of private label and retail space would further shoppers’ experiences as well as enhance brand values.

\"\"Kate Spade is a great example of a store that remains conscious of brand values at all times and designs their physical and virtual spaces with strict attention to value cues and brand identity. The storefronts of Kate Spade exude a playful nature using bright colors, strong seasonal themes, and a vibrant aesthetic. Inside, this strong identity is continued in the \’statement piece\’ Kate Spade merchandise and brand expression is reflected through in-store furnishings that echo the vibrant quirkiness of the window displays. By doing this, Kate Spade ensures that the spirit that draws the consumer into the store itself also draws the consumer to a point of sale. This consistent and holistic brand experience drives sales and encourages brand loyalty.

\"\"Your retail space is your brands’ home. Consider where your brand lives and how all the elements work within it. From the retail concept, to segmentation, packaging design, messaging and POS, take ownership of your space and reclaim your aisles!

\"\"Tess Wicksteed, Strategy Director, Pearlfisher
Tess’s great talent is the instant ability to see the wood for the trees. As the creative force behind Pearlfisher’s strategic offer, she trades in originality, clarity and logic, getting to the point fast and delivering strategy that’s both creative and cohesive. A longstanding Pearlfisher person, Tess was Strategy Director in London for ten years before relocating with her family for a brand new challenge in New York.

As a literature student at York, Sussex and Cambridge Universities, Tess was keen to become first a clown, then a teacher. However, it was her belief that good culture matters that finally led to a career in design and an ongoing commitment to creating powerful brands that contribute positively to the world. Short and sharp in all things, Tess balances refreshing bluntness with disarming humanity. Her presence on a project promises fireworks – and guarantees results.

\"\"
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guests Pearlfisher Tess Wicksteed

Private Label – Lifestyle Brands?

This guest post comes from frequent contributor, Tess Wickstead, Strategy Director of the international design agency Pearlfisher. Her post discusses the concept of Lifestyle brands and their relevance to retailers.

I love this concept if we are going t evolve Private Brands to be differentiating assets they must have the ability to be more than the national brands they have  historically mimicked, more than the category labels that pretend to be brands (almost any retailer owned organic or beef brand) and much more than the shallow good, better, best tiers that mean nothing to consumers.

We often hear brands refer to themselves as Lifestyle brands,  but what does this mean in the context of real life? How can a private label retailer become a \’lifestyle brand\’?
In the past, Lifestyle branding has typically been about presenting a well defined image of a style of living, with a strong philosophy, specific set of values and a very distinct aesthetic. These traditional lifestyle brands tend to be very aspirational. At the premium end, think Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, or Martha Stewart. However, often these brands can present  a way of living that is so \’perfect\’ that it can feel both intimidating and inflexible, especially when compared to how we realistically live today.

As a result we are seeing a shift in lifestyle branding. Brands are no longer dictating a specific lifestyle for consumers to buy wholesale. Now we see brands allowing consumers to mold them to fit their personal style, so that they fit in with how we live our lives.

Unbranding:
Labour & Wait
is a London based retailer that has a focus on \’un branding\’. Unlike traditional lifestyle brands whose value rests in their overtly branded products, Labour & Wait builds on their image of traditional, authentic British homewares with no branding on products. This lack of branding means that products feel more collected than produced making everything feel one-of-a kind and also unified through a beautiful aesthetic. The un-branded aesthetic allows us to enjoy the products as part of our personal style. 

\"\"Allowing for individual interpretation:
Similarly, brands like Uniqlo, American Apparel and The Gap, succeed because they continue to play on individual interpretation, rather than creating a single aesthetic or image. Japanese brand Uniqlo has created a position focused on the individual interpretation of style, with international ad campaigns that feature local celebrities wearing basic items in their own way. American Apparel is all about self expression, encouraging people to wear their basics in unexpected and inventive ways, which ultimately elevates the brand through their creativity. These brands are presenting their products as a base, a starting point for individual style. \"\"
Lifestyle Curator:
Brands like Jme, Anthropologie, and ABC Carpet & Home, realize that consumers are both seeking out specialty items and living through an individual mix of brands. These brands are sourcing products from a variety of independent designers and we see them designing in-house ranges under speciality sub brands. Anthropologie even became famous for their internal curation when their buyer at large landed a show called Man Shops Globe on the Discovery Channel. The doc-style series mirrors the delight of discovery one experiences when shopping in the whimsical and almost cluttered Anthropologie stores. These brands truly become lifestyle curators, offering consumers a mix of products from different sources and building an image on individuality and specialty.

\"\"Lifestyle brands for today\’s modern living.
Today, most innovative lifestyle retail brands are positioning themselves as individual and personal, inspiring customers with a unique mix of products and values to help them build their own interpretation of modern living. The next generation of lifestyle brands will present a more open discourse with consumers on living, inspiring and educating, to help each individual create the perfect home for their own personal needs and way of life.

\"\"Tess Wicksteed, Strategy Director, Pearlfisher
Tess’s great talent is the instant ability to see the wood for the trees. As the creative force behind Pearlfisher’s strategic offer, she trades in originality, clarity and logic, getting to the point fast and delivering strategy that’s both creative and cohesive. A longstanding Pearlfisher person, Tess was Strategy Director in London for ten years before relocating with her family for a brand new challenge in New York.

As a literature student at York, Sussex and Cambridge Universities, Tess was keen to become first a clown, then a teacher. However, it was her belief that good culture matters that finally led to a career in design and an ongoing commitment to creating powerful brands that contribute positively to the world. Short and sharp in all things, Tess balances refreshing bluntness with disarming humanity. Her presence on a project promises fireworks – and guarantees results.

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