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Waitrose

Waitrose Launches Value Campaign Featuring Essentials

\"\"English premium supermarket Waitrose is launching its biggest ever value focused campaign to reinforce its price commitments in the wake of rival Tesco’s Big Price Drop initiative.

The grocer says its 1000s of ways to great value campaign will highlight its value proposition, which includes a promise to price match Tesco on more than 1000 products and the Essentials range.

Waitrose also hopes to raise awareness that it offers more than 1000 products on sale every week and is the only supermarket to offer free delivery on all online orders to address consumers perception that it is more expensive than its rivals.

The Waitrose campaign, which launches October 6th, includes TV, print, web, a mobile display ad campaign, in-store marketing and customer communications.

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Pearlfisher The Private Brand Movement 2010 Conference Waitrose

Waitrose LOVES life at the Private Brand Movement

The highlight of yesterday morning at the Private Brand Movement conference was a presentation from Jonathan Ford, Creative Partner with the international design agency Pearlfisher and Maggie Hodgetts, Head of Design, for the UK based grocer Waitrose. Their presentation, Design for Life – Creating a New Design Language for Health and Wellbeing in the Retail Sector” brought a unique global perspective to the conference and was the culmination of a goal that we set last year for the conference of broadening the agenda and presenting a global perspective.

\"\"The UK based grocer Waitrose has 264 stores in the United Kingdom, which account for 4.2% of the UK grocery market with total sales of $5 billion pounds last year.

The pair teamed up to present not only the business case for the development of the new “better for you” brand Waitrose LOVE life, but the strategic vision and design philosophy which guided it’s development.

Jonathan Ford explained the design and strategic philosophy of his agencies approach to the problem with one simple sentence: “Successful brands have to have a strong truth and be desirable design is the bridge between truth and desire.”

Maggie went on to tell the largely American audience more about the iconic UK grocer, its history and guiding principles as well as the insight which guided the creation of the new Private Brand: “The pleasure of food and the essence of health, coming together to create the ideal good life.”

The goal was to celebrate health and wellbeing by changing it from negative to positive abandoning the old cliché of restriction, dieting and denial and replacing them with a new aesthetic guided buy a set of core values:

  • Vitality
  • Simplicity
  • Variety
  • Knowledge
  • Inspiration

This strategy led to Pearlfisher\’s discovery of the essence of the brand as it is expressed in a natural vibrancy, a brand based around vibrant colours and playful nontraditional food photography that expresses the essence of the food. The use of stacked foods on brightly colored backgrounds, which perfectly reinforce the design essence, and brightness of the brand.

\"\"But this wasn’t just and identity for a Private Brand but  a brand concept that presented the Waitrose philosophy of health to its customers, communications which reinforced this ideal include shopping bags, recipe books and a quarterly magazine that promotes the Private Brand and reinforces the idea of bringing healthy living to customer.

The brand was also supported by print advertising, point of sale, outdoor including: the largest backlit billboard in London, transportation billboards, TV and street level posters as well as ROP ads.

This is an excellent example of a well thought out retail strategy, fearless retail decision makers and an agency partner that creates compelling design that delivers on the business objective.

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2010 FMI Private Brand Summit Jonathon Ford Waitrose

The Future Visual Codes of Health and Wellbeing in Private Brand

\"\"This guest post comes from frequent contributor Jonathan Ford, Creative Partner branding and design agency Pearlfisher. Jonathan gives My Private Brand readers an exclusive preview of his upcoming presentation at The Private Brand Movement conference in Chicago with Maggie Hodgetts of Waitrose on the principles of retail branding. “‘Design for Life’ – Creating a New Design Language for Health and Wellbeing in the Retail Sector

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The future visual codes of health and wellbeing in private label 

Health and wellbeing is a huge global industry and, when it comes to food, the growth of the sector has been exponential with its move from the dedicated health food stores and independents to becoming one of the mainstays and key sellers for supermarkets and private label. In line with this, the communication of health and its values has also undergone something of an evolution. But – up until now – we have seen something of a fractured and fragmented marketplace with health slotting into fairly typical – and maybe expected – visual codes. And, in general, split between a residual and protective approach and a more forthright dominant and directive one.

\"\"Originally, and in line with its health food store roots, private label retailers did health branding in a way that was really about credibility and trust and used elements of the existing and residual aesthetic – Food Lion’s ‘Nature’s Place’ and GIANT’S ‘Nature’s Promise’ are two notable examples. The design was somewhat worthy and as a result the look and feel was often quite dry as credibility came at the expense of emotion. But there is no doubt that this initial approach worked whilst brands and retailers tried to establish this type of food in a new environment. This approach – along with other categories such as beauty – then morphed into a reliance on facts and almost a medicinal look and feel as the dictatorial and more expert type of medicinal brands came to the fore – brands such as Benecol and Yakult.

However, when more and more health brands did become credible and the market became a lot more saturated, branding started to change and be more about the actual brand identity. Retailers started upping the branding because credibility was saturated and all health brands were proving the credibility. And design started to try to communicate the brand values more and more. But this meant that in the healthy private label landscape, it became more like a battle of the brands and design was led by logo and brands shouting health through dominant and directive visual and written cues – such as Whole Foods Market ‘Health Starts Here’, Fresh & Easy’s ‘eatwell’ range and Safeway’s ‘Eating Right’…

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Both of these approaches have undoubtedly fulfilled a need and been indicative of the required response to the consumer mindset of the time as we embrace the health & wellbeing journey. But we are now entering a world where healthy brands need to allow us to make health our own. What people really want – and need – is a better and more personal connection to health and people are becoming more attracted to individual and personality led brands. As a result, brands and retailers in this sector are obviously conscious of being left behind and so we are starting to see a new breed of brands and ranges emerging that are more about individual expression and emotionally led branding.

Waitrose’s new LOVE life range is leading the way for a new direction. Not just for private label – but across the whole retail sector. The new range has created an innovative, vibrant and exciting design language for health and wellbeing that excites and gives freedom to the consumer. Yes, it is capturing and tying into the existing Waitrose philosophy but, more than that, it is celebrating health and wellbeing as a positive part of consumers’ individual lives and lifestyles – and not the lifestyle dictated by the parent brand. Health needs to be liberating and health brands should make us feel liberated and like they are fitting around – and for – us. LOVE life is not about not about proving credibility through un-emotional facts and dictatorial branding. But neither is it about a brand or a big branded logo. The naming and the design expression brings taste and vitality together to create an experience based on freedom, choice and pleasure. Above all, it is expressive and provides the new experiential and emotional connection that consumers are looking for not just with health but on an holistic level with their chosen retailer and its label.

\"\"I will be presenting the Waitrose LOVE Life design case study with Maggie Hodgetts, Head of Design, at the Private Brand Movement conference in Chicago, September 21. For more information on the event please click here. For more information on the Waitrose LOVE Life case study, you can also email me on jonathan@pearlfisher.com

Jonathan Ford, Creative Partner, Pearlfisher
www.pearlfisher.com
http://twitter.com/#!/pearlfisherlive

http://twitter.com/#!/jforddesigns

My Private Brand readers can register with the code MYPBRAND and receive 20% off the standard rates.

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Jonathon Ford Pearlfisher The Private Brand Movement 2010 Conference Waitrose

Make Your Private Brand Resonate: Empathy

Today marks the third guest post from Jonathan Ford, Creative Partner at Pearlfisher on the principles of retail branding. Jonathan will be presenting \”\’Design for Life\’ – Creating a New Design Language for Health and Wellbeing in the Retail Sector\” alongside Maggie Hodgetts of Waitrose in a few weeks at The Private Brand Movement conference in Chicago

My Private Brand readers can register with the code MYPBRAND and receive 20% off the standard rates.

The key principles of retail branding

Principle 4 – Empathy
Retail segmentation needs to be defined and inspired by a shopper’s mood, circumstance and occasion. That means presenting your offer in a way that resonates with current and future consumers. The big picture needs to be examined as well as all the elements of your brand, recognizing their role and function individually and as part of the whole. The complete picture needs to make sense but should also unlock new thinking and room for future growth.

Woolworths, the South African retailer, wanted their organic range to resonate more with their consumers. The bold, natural design is one which works across the whole store from sauces to signage. The organic shapes are classic and versatile, ensuring they live well into the future.

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To meet Jonathan and learn more about Private Brands join me at the conference.

Jonathan Ford, Creative Partner, Pearlfisher
www.pearlfisher.com

My Private Brand readers can register with the code MYPBRAND and receive 20% off the standard rates.

Source: Next Big Design

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Jonathon Ford Pearlfisher The Private Brand Movement 2010 Conference Waitrose

Authenticity & Seduction in Retail Branding

\"\"Today marks the second guest post from Jonathan Ford, Creative Partner at Pearlfisher on the principles of retail branding. Jonathan will be presenting \”\’Design for Life\’ – Creating a New Design Language for Health and Wellbeing in the Retail Sector\” alongside Maggie Hodgetts of Waitrose in a few weeks at The Private Brand Movement conference in Chicago. To learn more about the event, click here.

My Private Brand readers can register with the code MYPBRAND and receive 20% off the standard rates.

Following from Jonathan\’s last post about the retail branding principle \’Clarity\’, we move on to principles 2 and 3, Authenticity and Seduction.

\"\"Principle 2. Authenticity
Expressing a ‘true’ brand spirit relies on reflecting knowledge, integrity and style through all the layers of the brand; it’s about consistently communicating product quality, provenance, personality and design worthiness.

The Jme lifestyle range for Jamie Oliver is an eclectic, exciting mix of food products and products for the home. However, Jamie Oliver didn\’t want a brand that was just about him and the design for the products within the Jme brand portfolio champions the individual qualities of the products over Jamie\’s personality. Because of this, the design steers well clear of typical celebrity imagery or name checking, turning traditional celebrity branding on its head. Built on collaborations with a host of designers and suppliers from around the world, the designs for the portfolio of products celebrate the authentic individuality of each products origin and quality. The result is an eclectic and inspirational range, with design that reflects the products individual character with honesty and style.

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Principle 3. SEDUCTION
Irresistible retail experiences are those that create sensorial impact. Everything, from the way products are packaged to how they are presented in-store through innovative, stunning and stylish design should touch people and make them want to come back for more. All the senses are stimulated in the Crabtree & Evelyn stores. The new design for Crabtree & Evelyn debuted with the launch of the brands Keystone Florals fragrance range – Lily, Rosewater and Lavender and captures the beauty of Crabtree whilst expressing its specialness in a contemporary way. The new design elevates Crabtree to an entirely unique and desirable lifestyle brand and creates a holistic experience across all the brands touch-points, from packaging design to in-store experience.

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Jonathan Ford, Creative Partner, Pearlfisher
jonathan@pearlfisher.com
www.pearlfisher.com

Source: Next Big Design

 

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