Walmart Redesigns Great Value Kids Cereal

The old Great Value Design On Left - New on Right

After the redesign and re-launch of Walmart mega Private Brand “Great Value” close to two years ago the Bentonville giant continues to evolve package design and overall architecture. The most recent iteration comes in the children’s cereal category, where the new design follows earlier artificial sweetener packaging and minimizes the Great Value mark, making it smaller and shifting it to the top right hand corner of the box. With the shift of the logo the product name moves to center stage and adopts a dynamic, design that feels comfortable in the category. The predominant white becomes milk flowing from the top of the box into a large, cropped bowl of cereal.

The evolution of the brand to include category relevant architecture and design is an exciting move that gives Walmart the opportunity to build a “Great” brand that trades its oppressive and monolithic language and architecture for a consumer relevant yet cohesive brand experience.



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Christopher Durham

Christopher Durham is the president of My Private Brand and the co-founder of The Vertex Awards. He is a strategist, author, consultant and retailer who built brands at Delhaize-owned Food Lion, and lead strategy and brand development for Lowe’s Home Improvement. He has consulted with retailers around the world on their private brand portfolios including: Family Dollar, Petco, Staples, Office Depot, Best Buy, Metro (Canada), TLW (Taiwan) and Hola (Taiwan).

Durham has published five definitive books on private brands, including his first book, Fifty2: The My Private Brand Project. In 2017, he will debut his newest book, Vanguard: Vintage Originals, a visual tour of innovation and disruption in private brand going back to the mid-1800’s.
Dynamic in his presentation while down to earth and frank in his opinions, he has presented at numerous conferences, including FUSE, The Dieline Conference, Packaging that Sells, Omnishopper and PLMA’a annual trade show in Chicago.

Durham lives in Charlotte, NC with his wife, Laraine, and two daughters, Olivia and Sarah.