Private Brands Generic or Not?

Lifestyle expert Robyn Moreno, author of “Practically Posh,” presents an interesting report on Private Brand on The Early Show on Saturday Morning. The report compares national brands and Private Brands in a broad range of categories including: pain relievers, fashion, make-up, toiletries and gasoline. Despite the use of the somewhat condescending term Generic, the Private Brand shines.

Generic and Store Brands vs. Brand Names
Lifestyle Expert Tells When It’s Worth the Extra Money for Brand Names, and When It’s Not

(CBS) The security of buying a name brand product may cost you a little extra, but is it worth it when the generic or store brand version of the same item is sitting right there on the store or supermarket shelf?

Lifestyle expert Robyn Moreno, author of “Practically Posh,” said on “The Early Show on Saturday Morning” that — it depends on the product

Pain Relievers
When it comes to pain relievers, if there’s a generic version available, go for it.
To be certified a “generic” by the Food and Drug Administration, a pain reliever hasto have the same “active ingredient” as its brand name equivalent. For instance, the “active ingredient” in Advil is ibuprofen. The generic also has to have an efficacy rate similar to that of a name brand, usually within a 20 percent range.

Name brands cost more because those companies spend money on research and development, as well as advertising, and generics ride their coattails, so to speak.

All this means if you have a headache and want ibuprofen, you can get a store brand, such as Equate from Wal-Mart, at a cheaper price than Advil, and they’ll work essentially the same.

The main difference between the two is that store/brands can contain additives, like caffeine, which will have side effects. And generics might be absorbed differently in the body (gel caps compared to pills, for instance), which affects efficacy. So, check with your doctor and try out the more affordable versions for yourself to see if they work for you.

Read the entire story.



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Christopher Durham
Christopher Durham is the president of My Private Brand and the co-founder of The Vertex Awards. He is a strategist, author, consultant and retailer who built brands at Delhaize-owned Food Lion, and lead strategy and brand development for Lowe’s Home Improvement. He has consulted with retailers around the world on their private brand portfolios including: Family Dollar, Petco, Staples, Office Depot, Best Buy, Metro (Canada), TLW (Taiwan) and Hola (Taiwan). Durham has published five definitive books on private brands, including his first book, Fifty2: The My Private Brand Project. In 2017, he will debut his newest book, Vanguard: Vintage Originals, a visual tour of innovation and disruption in private brand going back to the mid-1800’s. Dynamic in his presentation while down to earth and frank in his opinions, he has presented at numerous conferences, including FUSE, The Dieline Conference, Packaging that Sells, Omnishopper and PLMA’a annual trade show in Chicago. Durham lives in Charlotte, NC with his wife, Laraine, and two daughters, Olivia and Sarah.